Creatives
400

The Great Migration of the Bani Hilal

In the 10th century, herders fled drought in Arabia, but the sultan of Egypt used them against his rivals. Their story went viral—oral-folklore style—as Sirat Bani Hilal, or the Romance of the People of the Crescent Moon.
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  • Creatives
  • Then
400

Epic Nation

The script could have been lifted from one of Central Asia’s traditional oral epics: A nomad woman spends her 97-year lifetime defending, ruling and ultimately uniting dozens of tribes, losing a husband and a son to enemies while laying the foundation for a nation. But it’s true: Kurmanjan was her name, and her country is Kyrgyzstan, where a new film tells her story to the world.
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  • Creatives
  • Now
  • Then
400

More Than One Story: The Jameel Prize

Open to artists of any background and awarded in June for the fourth time, the biennial Jameel Prize recognizes contemporary art and design inspired by Islamic tradition, encouraging what one judge calls the “alternative modernities” that are “happening everywhere.”
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400

FirstLook: Kitab al-Filaha

“Of Planting the Quince Tree” (chapter 8, article 36): It is said that the quince tree  is called the Almond of India. One of the species casts a large round fruit, the other small, while another is long and is called a monhad. Of these there are both sweet and sour fruit. According to the book of Ibn Hajaj, place the quince tree in low ground where moisture and humidity lie. Labathio said sandy ground is suitable too, provided it is manured and watered regularly.
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  • Tastes
400

50 Years Behind the Lens

In 1966, a Norwegian-born, Mexico-educated, Beirut-resident photographer and journalist named Tor Eigeland took his first assignment for this magazine. Since then, his byline has appeared more than 50 times on some of our most popular stories from around the globe. Now living in England, he reflects on a few of his—and the editors’—favorite images.  

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  • Creatives
  • Voyages
400

The Poetics of Suspense

Author Ausma Zehanat Khan talks about her debut duo of detective novels that show up dressed as classic thrillers, but between their covers they turn out to be packing heavy on history, human rights, multicultural dilemmas and even classical Islamic poetry.
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