Then
400

Iraq's First Archeologist

Hormuzd Rassam was 19 years old to help with excavations. Soon he began to uncover long-forgotten palaces–temples at Nimrud and later at Nineveh, splendors of first-millennium-BCE Assyrian kings.
Read
  • Then

Iraq's First Archeologist

400

I Witness History: I, Down the Drain

I was carved to adorn a soldier's ring, but one day in the steamy bathhouse of the Second Legion Augusta, I came unglued, slipped my mooring, and then darkness–and plenty of rotten company–for nearly 2,000 years.
Read
  • Then

I Witness History: I, Down the Drain

400

Khartoum: A Tale of Two Rivers 

Sudan’s capital Khartoum is the gift of not one but two Niles—the White and the Blue—at whose meeting point arose a three-part metropolis.

Read
  • Now
  • Then

Khartoum: A Tale of Two Rivers 

400

The Shampooing Surgeon of Brighton

He wrote the first book in English by an author of Indian origin and opened London’s first Indian restaurant, but he is remembered most along England’s south coast for his therapeutic steam baths.

Read
  • Then

The Shampooing Surgeon of Brighton

400

Carsten Niebuhr and the Danish Expedition to Arabia

Of six men who set out from Denmark in 1761, disease took five; only Carsten Niebuhr—mapmaker and empathic observer—returned, and he published what became a foundation of European scientific knowledge of Arabia.

Read
  • Then
  • Voyages

Carsten Niebuhr and the Danish Expedition to Arabia

400

The Legacy of Arabic in America

The eighth most-studied language in US schools and universities today is Arabic. That would please Edward E. Salisbury of Yale, who in 1841 became the country’s first full professor of Semitic languages—nearly 200 years after North America’s first Arabic class was offered at Harvard.

Read
  • Now
  • Then

The Legacy of Arabic in America

More

RSS Feed AramcoWorld MagazineAtom 1.0

Stay up to date

Subscribe to our newsletter to receive the latest features, events, reviews, teaching aids and digital-only content.