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400

Cracking Coconut's History

Ocean currents and maritime traders first brought coconuts to nearly every tropical coast. Now global food producers are bringing them to nearly every grocery shelf. Heritage cuisine, health fad or a little of both? Five recipes from five lands can help you decide.
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  • Tastes
400

Small American Town, Big Algerian Legacy

In 2008 Kathy Garms, a teacher in Elkader, Iowa, led the launch of a student essay contest in honor of her town’s Algerian namesake, Amir Abd el-Kader. In September this year’s seven winners received scholarships.
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400

Forest of Tides: The Sundarbans

Nourished from the north by three rivers from two nations and from the south by the Bay of Bengal, the world’s largest mangrove forest brings together not only rivers and sea, but also hundreds of plant and animal species as well as some 4 million people who live and work in and around the Sundarbans. Protected by both India and Bangladesh, the Sundarbans is listed as a UN World Heritage Site, its name meaning “beautiful forest” in Bengali. As populations and sea levels continue to rise, so too do the challenges.

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  • Voyages
400

Epic Nation

The script could have been lifted from one of Central Asia’s traditional oral epics: A nomad woman spends her 97-year lifetime defending, ruling and ultimately uniting dozens of tribes, losing a husband and a son to enemies while laying the foundation for a nation. But it’s true: Kurmanjan was her name, and her country is Kyrgyzstan, where a new film tells her story to the world.
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  • Creatives
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  • Then
400

More Than One Story: The Jameel Prize

Open to artists of any background and awarded in June for the fourth time, the biennial Jameel Prize recognizes contemporary art and design inspired by Islamic tradition, encouraging what one judge calls the “alternative modernities” that are “happening everywhere.”
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  • Creatives
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400

How The Middle Eastern Irrigation Ditch Called Acequia Changed The American Southwest

When Spanish settlers came to America’s Southwest in the late 1500s, they brought a much older irrigation practice that both distributed water and organized communities: the acequia. Today, nearly 1,000 of them are still flowing.
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