Tastes
400

The White Olives of Malta

In the Middle Ages, bajda olives—from the Arabic for “white”—were prized on this Mediterranean archipelago, but by the late 20th century they were nearly gone. It took a retired expert in gems and jewels to revive the olives knights once called “Maltese pearls.”
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400

Iftar Potluck Baltimore

In a suburb of Baltimore, Maryland, 15 families with origins across the world gather in the author’s backyard for iftar, the evening meal breaking the day-long fast during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan. It’s an American-style potluck, and each family brings not only food from homelands and traditions, but also stories and recipes. “Iftars are to me very much a party,” says Francesca Pagan, who has prepared an Italian stew of escarole and beans. “Food is one of those things that you do without during the day so you can get spiritually closer to God, but the reward of enjoying it after the sunset takes it to a whole new level.”
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400

Cracking Coconut's History

Ocean currents and maritime traders first brought coconuts to nearly every tropical coast. Now global food producers are bringing them to nearly every grocery shelf. Heritage cuisine, health fad or a little of both? Five recipes from five lands can help you decide.
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400

Street Food, Istanbul Style

From an eggy morning menemen to an afternoon tantuni wrap to a late-night handful of roasted kestane and more than a dozen delectables all in between, a search for the very best proves why Istanbul claims title as the street food capital of the world. 

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400

At Home with Harisa

Harisa has been widely popular in North Africa for 500 years, ever since dried peppers crossed the Atlantic and met olive oil. It’s easy to make on your own—but make enough to share with friends. One taste and you’ll know why.
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400

FirstLook: Kitab al-Filaha

“Of Planting the Quince Tree” (chapter 8, article 36): It is said that the quince tree  is called the Almond of India. One of the species casts a large round fruit, the other small, while another is long and is called a monhad. Of these there are both sweet and sour fruit. According to the book of Ibn Hajaj, place the quince tree in low ground where moisture and humidity lie. Labathio said sandy ground is suitable too, provided it is manured and watered regularly.
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