Flavors: Spinach and Lamb Curry (Sabzi)

Flavors: Spinach and Lamb Curry (Sabzi)

This type of spinach and lamb curry, called sabzi, is traditionally served with rice on Nowruz, the spring new year. 

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Art of Islamic Patterns: Mughal Jaali

Art of Islamic Patterns: Mughal Jaali

Decorative and functional, lattice screens have been produced in countless geometric forms across Islamic lands over centuries. In New Delhi one such screen, there called a jaali, offers mesmerizing interplays of 6- and 12-sided figures. Originally crafted in the 16th century, it can be drawn today by following our step-by-step guide.

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Berlin’s Transcultural Jam

Berlin’s Transcultural Jam

A musical wave has been swelling for a decade in the German capital, which one local analyst now calls “the city of choice for a new generation of cultural talent from the Middle East and North Africa”—part of the greater demographic shift that has made people of Arab backgrounds Berlin’s fourth-largest ethnic-identity group. In street jams, clubs, studios, concert halls and online, new mixes of musicians are blending notes and ideas into genre-bending, transcultural fusions. “What we as artists in Berlin can do is tear down the borders in our head and invite others to do the same,” says musician Jamila Al-Yousef.

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Sustainability’s Dubai Beta Lab

Sustainability’s Dubai Beta Lab

Expo 2020 Dubai closed in March after showcasing buildings and displays designed to maximize sustainability, one of the Expo’s top themes. Creative systems for power generation, water conservation and city planning all addressed global challenges.

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Quartering Jerusalem

Quartering Jerusalem

Nearly all modern maps of Jerusalem’s Old City show it divided into four quarters labeled Christian, Muslim, Armenian and Jewish. But the idea that gave rise to these labels dates back only to the mid-19th century and surveys of the city by colonial mapmakers—and specifically to the pen of a young British chaplain.

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Reviving the Art of Tunisian Glass

Reviving the Art of Tunisian Glass

In the mid-1980s, Sadika Keskes fired up the first artisanal glass furnaces in Tunisia in 600 years. Since then she has revived a once-thriving heritage craft and, through her teaching, lit up imaginations among a new generation of artisans.
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Sweet Memories of a Middle Eastern Childhood: A Conversation with Salma Hage

Sweet Memories of a Middle Eastern Childhood: A Conversation with Salma Hage

Acclaimed cookbook author Salma Hage grew up in the mountains of the Kadisha Valley in Northern Lebanon. Like many cooks, she learned her craft at her mother’s knee, as well as those of other female relatives in her household, where she often took on the role of cook for her eleven siblings. Her most recent book, Middle Eastern Sweets, pays homage to the many sweet endings to traditional family meals plus the rich multicultural influences that have defined Lebanon and the region for centuries. These include a wide variety of cakes, cookies, pastries, ice creams and other delights, some classic and standard, others nuanced to suit the modern, health-conscious palate. Yet all reflect the distinctively Middle Eastern flavors that Hage came to know at an early age and which define the region’s fondness for desserts.
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FirstLook: A Mother’s Kiss

FirstLook: A Mother’s Kiss

For more than eight hours, we navigated the Sekonyer River in a wooden boat, cruising through Tanjung Puting National Park in the Central Kalimantan region of Borneo, Indonesia.

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Culture, People and Land: A Conversation with Matthew Teller

Culture, People and Land: A Conversation with Matthew Teller

International travel in 2020 went from a luxury enjoyed by some to an impossibility endured by all. British travel writer and journalist Matthew Teller witnessed his livelihood become grounded more abruptly than most.
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